A proposal for a coordinated effort for the determination of brainwide neuroanatomical connectivity in model organisms at a mesoscopic scale.

TitleA proposal for a coordinated effort for the determination of brainwide neuroanatomical connectivity in model organisms at a mesoscopic scale.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsBohland, Jason W., Wu Caizhi, Barbas Helen, Bokil Hemant, Bota Mihail, Breiter Hans C., Cline Hollis T., Doyle John C., Freed Peter J., Greenspan Ralph J., Haber Suzanne N., Hawrylycz Michael, Herrera Daniel G., Hilgetag Claus C., Z Huang Josh, Jones Allan, Jones Edward G., Karten Harvey J., Kleinfeld David, K├Âtter Rolf, Lester Henry A., Lin John M., Mensh Brett D., Mikula Shawn, Panksepp Jaak, Price Joseph L., Safdieh Joseph, Saper Clifford B., Schiff Nicholas D., Schmahmann Jeremy D., Stillman Bruce W., Svoboda Karel, Swanson Larry W., Toga Arthur W., Van Essen David C., Watson James D., and Mitra Partha P.
JournalPLoS Comput Biol
Volume5
Issue3
Paginatione1000334
Date Published2009 Mar
ISSN1553-7358
KeywordsAnimals, Brain, Databases, Factual, Humans, Macaca, Mice, Models, Neurological, Nerve Net, Neuroanatomy, Research Design
Abstract

In this era of complete genomes, our knowledge of neuroanatomical circuitry remains surprisingly sparse. Such knowledge is critical, however, for both basic and clinical research into brain function. Here we advocate for a concerted effort to fill this gap, through systematic, experimental mapping of neural circuits at a mesoscopic scale of resolution suitable for comprehensive, brainwide coverage, using injections of tracers or viral vectors. We detail the scientific and medical rationale and briefly review existing knowledge and experimental techniques. We define a set of desiderata, including brainwide coverage; validated and extensible experimental techniques suitable for standardization and automation; centralized, open-access data repository; compatibility with existing resources; and tractability with current informatics technology. We discuss a hypothetical but tractable plan for mouse, additional efforts for the macaque, and technique development for human. We estimate that the mouse connectivity project could be completed within five years with a comparatively modest budget.

DOI10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000334
Alternate JournalPLoS Comput. Biol.
PubMed ID19325892
PubMed Central IDPMC2655718
Grant ListR01 MH060974-17 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States

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